12.04.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Dec 4, 2017

 

Call to order by V.P. Mary Dewey

Invocation: Pat Brown

 

Pledge: Steve Winters

 

Introduction of Guests   

None

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

None

 

Mystery Person 

Mary Dewey made the award to Kelly Schilling for taking the initiative and carrying through with the “Support for First Responder Christmas Tree.”

Greeter   –

Ken Oster told of events around town where his 4-Part Harmony group, Chordbusters were performing: They sang at the Missouri Theater this past week on Saturday and later sang Christmas carols on Broadway. Next Saturday at 7:00 pm they will perform in concert along with others at the First Baptist Church on Broadway. Admission for this event is $10.00

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig  All were sign in. Carl Scott spotted a picture of Ken Oster with the Chordbusters in the local paper.
  • Food Bank  The food bank crew was preoccupied with our own Christmas tree fundraiser and couldn’t work the Food Bank this past week.–
  • Koeze/Certificate update: Steve Winters- Gift Certificates netted $25,925 vs last year’s net sales of $23,700.  Net profit this year amount to $7,777. The latest report on Koeze Nut sales and gift certificates is $97,493.
  • Tree Lot – John Sapp, C.O. Scheffer The cost of paid staff was down this past week as more members signed up and work the lot. The last of the Koeze nut orders will be ready for pick up this Saturday. Members are encouraged to pick them up this weekend to provide room for the club’s Christmas luncheon on Monday, December 11.
  • Tree lot sign up/ Cash Register – C.O. Scheffer again passed the signup sheets for members to volunteer as lot workers and cashiers. Also, members can sign up online. An email with a link to the electronic signup sheet will be sent for members not present at today’s luncheon.
  • Respect for Law – Kelly Schilling- C.O.  Kelly Schilling mentioned a photographer from the “Missourian” came to the lot on Tuesday and returned on Thursday for more pictures. She expects her photo-journalist report on the Optimist Tree lot and the Respect for First Responder tribute will appear in an upcoming edition of that paper. She took pictures of members working the lot on Tuesday. On Thursday she took pictures of Officers Anthony and Thomas and volunteers from Boys and Girls Club who were present at the lot. Rick McKernan reported he had heard a number of positive comments on the Respect for Law Christmas tree and thanked Kelly for all the work and time she has contributed to this effort.
  • Holiday luncheon:  Dec 11th at the Club House.  – Larry Fick reports 40 members and guests are sign up for next Monday’s Christmas luncheon at 11:30 at the clubhouse. He will email members one last time to see if there are any last minute deciders.
  • Board – No December meeting

 

Today’s Speaker

Dan Steska, Bike to the Future

 

Dan Steska is a recent retiree who got together with four other retirees to find a project in which they could all invest some of their newfound time. They discovered an unmet need in Columbia where they could apply their time and discover new talents. With the amount of poverty in Columbia they discovered a significant population living in poorer neighborhoods that were unserved by the bus lines. Many of these people were forced to walk to work and find transportation to satisfy their shopping needs. Dan and company wanted to provide a more efficient form of transportation for this group. From this was born Bike to the Future, an organization founded to find, repair and donate bikes to those in need.

 

With no apparent business plan and no skills in bike repair the five men decided they would find a way to salvage old bikes to make them usable. Their decision to go forward would be a work in progress. With a few donated bikes and rudimentary repair skills they began their enterprise. As they distributed these bikes, they discovered a more significant need for their services and a need to grow their business. They had to find a place to work, sources for a significantly higher number of used bikes and a source of revenue to purchase repair parts and additional bikes when donations were insufficient to handle demand.

 

Over the course of year they were able to solve these problems through the faith based community. Love INC (Love in the name of Christ) provided them with a place to work and to store inventory. When the Trailside Bike Rental shop in Rocheport closed and began liquidating its inventory of bikes, repair parts and tools, a revenue source was needed for a bulk purchase of this cache of inventory. A grant from the United Methodist Church came to the rescue. Later, the local bike shops in town offered a discount for the purchases of repair parts.

 

The initial success brought move demand for bikes. The Wilkes Blvd Church’s Turning Point applied for bikes of its homeless clients. And, as word spread more groups made their needs known. Homeless veterans living at Welcome Home, ex-offenders released to halfway houses in Columbia, disabled people, the population of a homeless community living in wooded areas, and refugees (some 220 sponsored by Catholic Charities) all needed transportation. To date Bike to the Future has accepted over 200 donated and purchased bikes donating 135 to needy recipients. They even found a three wheeled bike for a recipient afflicted with Parkinson’s disease.

 

Each recipient gets a bike, a lock, a helmet and a city map. Recipients are on their own for repairs but, according to Mary Dewey, Get About Columbia is offering repair classes this Saturday at the Armory. Bike to the Future volunteers work Tuesday mornings and afternoons and Wednesday mornings repairing bike at the Love INC store. The will accept volunteers as well as unwanted bikes and cash donations.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Dec 11 – Holiday Lunch at the Club House

Dec 18 – Sonja Boone,  Boone County Administrator

Dec 25 – No Meeting

Jan 1 – No Meeting

Jan 8 – Rachel Finch,  FACE

Jan 15 –TBD

Jan 22 – Jeniffer Clark, Community Programs, MU School of Law

Jan 29 – Peter Stiepleman, Supt. Columbia Public Schools

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 12:44

 

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

11.27.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Nov 27, 2017

Call to order: Ed Musterman

Invocation: by Red Leighton

Pledge: led by John Sapp

Introduction of Guests Noelle Case introduce her thirteen month old daughter, Haven. With the help of her mother, Haven waved to the luncheon group.

Birthdays and Anniversaries

None

Mystery Person – Jim Beckett awarded this week’s gift card to John Sapp for all the work he has done to make our Christmas tree fundraiser a success.

 

Greeter   – Phil Rodriquez told the group of events in his life during this past week. His Christmas light decorating company, started in St. Louis for his kids, has complete 132 houses in St. Louis in addition to some banks, clubs and restaurants. They are just getting started in Columbia where they completed decorations on 23 houses. Also, Phil officiated at a local high school wrestling match and later at three dual meets in Eldon, Camdenton and Moberly.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig Ken Oster paid his quarter to the pig for being slow to sign in. He mentioned he is selling caps for $12.00 each with the Kids First logo embroidered on them. Caps come in different colors and would be suitable gifts for kids.
  • Food Bank –Jim Murphy reported the Food Bank volunteers packaged “Buddy Packs” this past week. “Buddy Packs” consists of 2 cans of ravioli or other small canned meals, a trail bar, powdered milk and cereal.
  • Koeze/Certificate update: Steve Winters reported sales of Koeze Nuts sales reached $92,000 vs. $102,000 at this time last year. There is still time for members to get additional orders to him as Steve won’t close off the final order until Thursday, Nov 30.
  • Tree Lot – John Sapp, C.O. Scheffer reported as of Sunday the Christmas tree sales totaled somewhere between $18,850 and $24,000. Group consensus of those who worked this past weekend estimated the total had to be closer to the $24,000 number. This figure compares favorably to the $21,000 total during the same period last year. John Sapp reported he had to hire outside help to manage tree sales at a cost of $650.00
  • Tree lot sign up/ Cash Register – C.O. Scheffer
  • Respect for Law – Kelly Schilling- C.O. The special Christmas tree decorated with “thank you” ornaments for police, fire and first responders and mounted on a soap box derby car was on display.  Kelly has notified print and broadcast media of this tribute. Officer Justine Anthony used his twitter account to notify his 200 followers of this tribute.
  • Holiday luncheon:  Dec 11th at the Club House.  – Contact Larry Fick (lfick41@centurytel.net) if you wish to attend but haven’t yet signed up.
  • Board – No December meeting

 

 

Today’s Speaker

 

Randy Cole, City of Columbia, Housing Programs Coordinator Jerry Dowell Government Affairs Chair, Columbia Chamber of Commerce and Secretary on the Columbia Community land Trust.

 

Randy Cole moved to Columbia from Liberty, MO to attend graduate school at MU. As part of his studies in Public Service he accepted an internship with the Columbia city manager’s office and subsequently began work with the City. Jerry Dowell is local to Columbia attending Hickman H.S. and graduating from MU with a degree in Political Science. He works for the Columbia Chamber of Commerce as Director of Government Affairs. He is the current secretary to the board of the Columbia Community Land Trust (CCLT).

 

The CCLT was formed to provide a sustainable model for affordable housing in Columbia. It is patterned after similar programs in 46 states. Its mission is to “Strengthen our community through the creation and stewardship of permanently affordable housing.” It is an established 501-c (3), not-for-profit entity with an anticipated 9 member board of directors comprised of 1/3 community and business leaders, 1/3 neighborhood representative and 1/3 program participants. (Program participants will be added to the current 6-member board when houses are sold.)

 

CCLT defines affordable housing as paying 30% of family income for housing. Currently, it’s estimated many families are paying 50% of their income for housing. This causes disruption of family life, food instability, youth learning loss with frequent relocations often effecting school attendance, neighborhood instability and neighborhood crime. It is estimated every move to a different house causes a two month learning loss in a child.

 

The target populations are families with income below 80% of the median income for the area. The sixteen houses being built are all within the City’s Strategic Plan. The initial houses are in the neighborhood surrounding the Downtown Optimist Clubhouse, three on Lynn Street and one on King Ave. Randy Cole focused his comments on the Lynn Street houses that CCLT is building. The City acquired the land transferring ownership to CCLT while committing to improve the land within the same city block by burying electrical cables, improving the sanitary sewer system, installing a storm water retention system to alleviate the current flooding conditions, and creating a community garden. Funding in part is from Community Development Block Grants. Upon completion the new energy efficient houses are expected to sell without the land to qualified buyers for $100,000 each.

 

The Land Trust is partnering with Habitat for Humanity, Central Missouri Community Action, and Job Point to build a total of 16 houses within the Strategic Plan area. Their expectation is to create generational wealth for over 100 families over the next 50 years. Monthly mortgage payments along with taxes, insurance and energy efficiency payments to CCLT will easily be below $650.00. Qualified families who purchase the houses will not be required to pay private mortgage insurance because of the land value will remain under the ownership of CCLT. Families are expected to stay for about six year before acquiring enough equity to purchase a house elsewhere. (Under the purchase arrangement with CCLT, owners can capture all of the equity they have paid on the principle and 25% of the property appreciation.)

 

This is a substantial investment on the part of the community for long range objectives. Quantitative measures of program success include neighborhood stability by creating owner occupied homes, student academic improvement, neighborhood crime reduction and wealth accumulation.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Dec 4 –  Dan Steska, Bike to the Future

Dec 11 – Holiday Lunch at the Club House

Dec 18 – Sonja Boone,  Boone County Administrator

Dec 25 – No Meeting

Jan 1 – No Meeting

Jan 8 – TBD

Jan 15 –TBD

Jan 22 – TBD

Jan 29 – Peter Stiepleman, Supt. Columbia Public Schools

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

11.20.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Nov 20, 2017

 

Call to order: Ed Musterman

Invocation: Larry Fick

 

Pledge: Jack Cruise

 

Introduction of Guests   

 

Sid Sullivan introduced his lovely wife, Joan. Shirley Beckett declined introduction. Phil Rodriquez introduced Clifford (Cliff) McComb, II, Marketing Manager at his company. Ed Musterman introduced new members Mark Snyder, Johan Westbrook and Adam Bakos all of Snyder Engineering.

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

None

 

Mystery Person – Cyrilla Galbreath awarded today’s gift card to Scott Stager for all his volunteer work sorting Koeze Nut orders for delivery.

 

Greeter   – C.O. Scheffer spent last weekend at the J.C. Holiday parade joining his wife, Rachel who organized the parade as the JC president. He noted the JC’s are looking for new sponsors as they plan to discontinue sponsoring this event due to their own declining membership. C.O is also continuing his preparation work with the holiday fundraisers.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig Carl Scott had no reason to pay the pig this week but commented the rear clubhouse door was left unlocked.  Also, he alerted members the two outside electric receptacles on the north wall of the clubhouse are now working.
  • Optimist Holiday Dinner and Dance Rick Kitchen from Kids first Optimist came today to promote the Saturday, December 2 annual event to be held at the Sunrise Optimist Clubhouse. BYO Cocktails at 6:30 pm, Dinner at 7:00 pm followed by Music and Dance at 8:30 pm ‘til… Guests are invited to bring an unwrapped gift for kids at Coyote Hills.… For $30.00 per couple the menu includes oven roasted prime rib, baked potato, winter blend vegetables, hot rolls with butter, tea and coffee all prepared by Sunrise cook, David Dow. Dinner will be followed by holiday desserts prepared special by Optimists’ wives. Single guests will be accepted at $20.00 per person. For cost containment you must have been register by November 24 to attend. Contact Rick Kitchen at Ina_minute@hotmail.com or by phone at 573-808-1561. (the first part of the email should read Ina_minute)
  •  Holiday luncheon:  Dec 11th at the Club House.  – Larry Fick reports 36 guests are signed up already. He is still accepting more for this Hy-Vee catered lunch with entertainment at the clubhouse at 11:30 am. If you haven’t made arrangements for this $10.00/guest bargain, contact Larry at lfick41@centurytel.net
  • Board Meeting –   Nov 16th. Approved Grant of $1,160 to Benton STEM Elementary, Gift of $200 to Toys for Tots at the request of Mary Dewey.  Harold Rowe was acting Secretary and did a fine job
  • Food Bank – Food Bank volunteers.  Jim Murphy couldn’t attend last week. Carl Scott said he was late (probably lingering outside when he discovered this was Hot Dog Monday) Sue Musterman worked the Food Bank booth at the Art Show held over the weekend in Parkade Plaza.
  • Koeze/Certificate update: Steve Winters reports the second order of Koeze Nuts are all packaged and ready at the clubhouse for member pickup. Restaurant certificate are ready for delivery as well. Members not present at lunch can pick up their certificates at the clubhouse.
  • Tree Lot – John Sapp announce the trees are ready for the lot opening this Friday. On a sad note, he advised the club he just heard one of his long standing workers got back on drugs. With concern for the reported disappearing package  of Koeze Nut candies, he advised the need to separate out the Koeze Nut pickup in the clubhouse as his workers use the inside toilets during their work shifts.
  • YOHO/Alternative general membership meeting.- See Respect for Law
  •  Respect for Law – Kelly Schilling- C.O. –  YOHO’s to meet Tuesday and Wed evenings of this week at the club house to decorate the tree for the Respect for Law program.
  • Tree lot sign up/ Cash Register  Every Monday at lunch and the electronic sign-up sheet will be emailed out for your use outside the lunch.

 

Today’s Speaker

Professors Jeanne Abbot & Mike Jenner– MU School of Journalism, Professional Standards and Code of Ethics.

Mike Jenner has been in newspapers his whole life. He got his first job in the business at age 15 in the earl ’60. After graduating from the J-school in 1975, he initially worked in small town papers before moving on to Hartford, Conn where he emerged to become the paper’s managing editor. In the 90’s he moved to Bakersville, CA spending 17 years with the local paper, the last 10 of which were as Executive Editor of the newspaper. He returned to Columbia in 2010 to be closer to family and is now Professor of Journalism and the Executive Editor of the Missourian.

 

Jeanne Abbot is originally from St. Louis and a graduate of the J-School. She initiated her journalism career in Alaska at an interesting time shortly after Alaskan statehood. She continued her career while thawing out for several years working in both the newspaper and California State University in Sacramento. She later worked at the Des Moines (Iowa) Register becoming its managing editor before returning to Columbia and joining the J-School as Associate Professor and Managing Editor of the Missourian

 

Founded in 1908 the Missouri School of Journalism was the first journalism school in the world. It’s a place where students learn by doing. They gather information from an assignment and bring it back for layers of faculty review. Students are taught to verify their information for accuracy, be transparent in their stories, never add anything, seek out multiple sources and verify any math. They are taught to exercise the meaning of their First Amendment right. Their speech is protected as long as they are truthful and not malicious. They are to operate under a code of ethics specific in general to journalism and in particular to the J-School: they are to seek the truth, identify sources, label analysis, not plagiarize, minimize harm, be sensitive to the vulnerable and those not familiar with journalism and be humble. This means they are to avoid conflicts of interest, accept no gifts no matter how small and offer no special treatment to advertisers.

 

J-School students rotate through the Missourian experience for a four month stint.  They have classes as well as hands on experiences in gathering and reporting news where a cohort of 40 to 50 students move from novices to skilled reporters in this profession. There are thirteen faculty who provide layers of mentoring in the creation of an accurate, unbiased, contextual and readable article. Above all they are taught trust is hard to gain and easy to lose. Errors get printed on page 1 soon after discovery. At a time when conflicting information is available from many sources, the journalist must guard against their own biases to gain and keep the trust of readers and consumers of their stories.

 

This presentation ended prematurely at 1:00 pm with questions awaiting to be asked. Both professors were kind enough to remain afterward to answer questions and listen to comments.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Nov 27 – Randy Cole, City of Columbia, Housing Programs Coordinator

Dec 4 – Dan Steska, Bike to the Future

Dec 11 – Holiday Lunch at the Club House

Dec 18 – Sonja Boone,  Boone County Administrator

Dec 25 – No Meeting

Jan 1 – No Meeting

Jan 8 – TBD

Jan 15 –TBD

Jan 22 – TBD

Jan 29 – Peter Stiepleman, Supt. Columbia Public Schools

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

11.13.17 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Nov 13, 2017

Call to order: Ed Musterman at 12:05

Invocation: Pat Brown

 

Pledge: Ken Oster

 

Introduction of Guests   Kelly Schilling introduced her parents, Tim and Donna Boos, who are visiting. She also introduced Officer Justin Thomas of the Columbia Police Department who is helping her with the Law Appreciation tribute for display at the tree lot. Standing guest Shirley Beckett was also present

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

Steve Winters has a birthday on Thursday November 16.

 

Mystery Person –

Jim Murphy made today’s award to Mary Dewey for all the fine work she has done in running our weekly membership meeting when President Musterman is absent.

 

Greeter   -Scott Stager was today’s greeter. His week was for the most part unmemorable. He did, however, remember all the leaves he raked from his yard as well as those in his neighbors’ yard on both sides. Also, he made the big leap into the 21st Century by buying a Smart Phone. Seems his sister’s kids no longer email. He has to text them to maintain contact. When asked about his bread baking, he reported a lapse in this activity although he still plans to organize a bread baking group for the Ronald McDonald House.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig  All were signed in and wearing badges.
  • Food Bank –Jim Murphy reported that he, Larry Fick and Carl Scott spent last week packaging chicken (six breasts to a plastic bag). One of them separated the frozen parts, the next bagged them and the third tied off the bag.
  • Koeze/Certificate update: Steve Winters reported YTD sales of Koeze Nuts at $80,000 is down $20,000 from sales during the same period last year. The next shipment of Koeze Nuts is expected this Thursday. Steve will package them Friday evening (Help needed at 5:00 pm. Many hands make light work)
  • Hy-Vee Food Drive- Carl Scott announce the Hy-Vee Food Drive will take place next Tuesday, November 21at all three Hy-Vee locations from 6:00 am until 6:00 pm.
  • Tree Lot – John Sapp reports 300 trees from northern Michigan will arrive today. Another shipment of 450 trees is expected Wednesday. All trees this year are coming from Michigan. The Wednesday shipment is coming from a grower about 100 miles south of Traverse City. Steve Winters reported the 29 member MU Baseball Team unloaded the last shipment is record time. They also polished off 12 ½ large pizzas of the 15 supplied in record time.
  • YOHO/Alternative general membership meeting.- No report
  • Respect for Law – Kelly Schilling reported work is underway on the tribute to law enforcement and first responders. She will select an 8’ tree and decorate it with red, white and blue ribbons. Cards will be provided for people to add notes of appreciation. There will be three sections for notes designated by color, red, blue and green. Kelly is in contact with KOMU and other news groups for media coverage. Scott Stager offered lights he purchased for the tree. Carl Scott is working with an electrician to provide a convenient electrical outlet for the tree lights. A soap box derby floorboard will be used for the tree stand to provide the mobility needed to move the tree in and out of the clubhouse.
  • Ground Breaking Ceremony – Adam Saunders has invited the club members to a ground breaking of the Agricultural Park next to the ARC and Columbia Farmers Market.  The event takes place at 10:00 on Nov 18th.
  • Cash Register Training at the Club House 5:30 on Nov 16th, immediately before the board meeting.
  • Tree lot sign up.  Every Monday at lunch and the electronic sign-up sheet will be emailed out for your use outside the lunch.
  • Holiday luncheon:  Dec 11th at the Club House.  – Larry Fick will bring the sign-up sheet and collect the $10.00 per guest for this event. The meal will be catered by Hy-Vee.
  • Board appointments needed: 2nd VP, Treasurer, and Secretary.

 

 

Today’s Speaker

Nikki Burton, Great Circle

Nikki Burton left a 12 year career in banking to join the fundraising team of this not-for-profit organization. She and her husband relocated to Columbia so she could help solicit funding for the Great Circle.

 

Great Circle has taken over where Boys and Girls Town left off as the provider of services for troubled and traumatized youth ages infant to 21 years in Missouri. They occupy the buildings and group homes on the South Bearfield Road campus (just south of Giving Gardens). They also operate “scattered site housing “to transition youth from their controlled environment back into the community at large. They report working with over 400 area children.

 

Their program is designed to work with youth who have been traumatized by a life experience, who have serious mental health problems or who need help to recover from drugs or alcohol dependency. The niches they serve are the kids prone to violent outbursts, who haven’t done well in a foster setting or are dangerous to themselves and others. The residential program has 50 kids ranging in age 6 18 years. Their stay is anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months. The campus school is accredited as an independent school. Great Circle also provides preventative and emergency services where their social workers go into the homes of traumatized kids. They work with other child serving agencies including the Circuit Court CASA program. Wards are referred from the courts, a private physician, the state child protective services or a self/family referral. Great Circle is hosting an Open House on December 11 from 4:00- 6:00 pm for anyone interested is seeing the facility on South Bearfield Rd.

 

Great Circle has two campuses, one in the St. Louis area, and the other here in Columbia. Funding coming from a multitude of sources: private and state grants, United Way and here in Columbia the ¼ cent youth mental health sales tax. Nikki works with a team of two other fundraisers charged to raise $500,000 annually.

 

Nikki announced the upcoming ”Winter Wishes Holiday Gift and Fund Drive” to be held later this month, November 27 – 30. People are encouraged to drop of a gift or monetary contribution at any of the Joe Machens’ Car dealerships in Columbia during this period. Other ways to give include offering grants to COMO gives December campaign, fulfill a child’s wish list, host a gift tree, provide a Wal-Mart or Target gift card for urgent clothing needs. For more info, contact Maggie Rotts at 573-442-5560 or Maggie.rotts@greatcirle.org.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Nov 20 – Professor Jeanne Abbot – MU School of Journalism, Professional Standards and Cold of Ethics.

Nov 27 – Randy Cole, City of Columbia, Housing Programs Coordinator

Dec 4 –  Dan Steska, Bike to the Future

Dec 11 – Holiday Lunch at the Club House

Dec 18 – Sonja Boone,  Boone County Administrator

Dec 25 – No Meeting

Jan 1  – No Meeting

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

11.06.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Nov 6, 2017

Call to order:  Mary Dewey

Invocation:by Pat Brown

Pledge: led by Jim Murphy

Introduction of Guests   

Jack Cruise introduced his wife, Jackie

Max Miller introduced his wife, Anne

Birthdays and Anniversaries

None

 

Mystery Person –Ken Oster made today’s award to Larry Fick for convincing him the Use Tax is a good thing for all.

 

Greeter   -Steve Winters agreed to tell his story of the week when he and Scott Stager were working late sorting the Koeze Nut shipment. Late Friday night Steve said it was time to quit and leave work for another day when Scott was looking for six cases Koeze Nuts to fill an order of eight canisters. The math didn’t work as there are six canisters to a case.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig.  Carl Scott reported receipts from the last time he emptied the Pig were $15.00. This gives a year to date total of $75.00. He encouraged more members to pay the Pig to increase our donation to a local Childhood Cancer funds. Ken Oster is Chair of this committee
  • Food Bank – Larry Fick and Jim Murphy reported they packaged chicken this past week (chicken breasts then chicken fingers).
  • Koeze/Gift Certificates – High praise for Steve & Scott, the only two who bagged Koeze orders.  More volunteers are needed for this.
  • Koeze/Certificate update: Steve Winters distributed restaurant certificates to members present. When picking up Koeze Nut for distribution, member should pay attention to a yellow dot on the sales slips for orders of both Koeze Nuts and Restaurant certificates. Also, C.O. is working on a system to accept credit card payments for our fundraising items.
  • Tree Lot – John Sapp. The MU Baseball Team will unload trees on Saturday morning, Nov 11 at 8:30. John requests members to show up to express our gratitude for the team’s help and to be on hand if they are shorthanded.
  • YOHO/Alternative general membership meeting. –Kelly Schilling reported the YOHOs had a good meeting. It was a small but growing group that wants to take on this year’s task of Honoring Law Enforcement and First Responders. They will decorate a Christmas tree with red, white and blue ribbons and notes from kids and others showing their appreciation for the work these people perform. The tree will be mobile and displayed at our clubhouse lot over the tree sale period. Early shift lot workers are requested to place the tree in the middle of wall mural and connect it to electricity. It is to be taken in each night. John Sapp emphasized the importance of position the tree in the middle of the mural to avoid any mishaps with outgoing trees during the tree sale operation.
  • 50th anniversary celebration of Rock Bridge State Park – Red Leighton honored as a Founding member. Also attending were Cyrilla Galbreath, Sue & Ed Musterman.  Rick and Susie McKernan were on their way and Susie fell and injured herself. The support of the Downtown Optimists was stated.   Cyrilla commented the folks selected for telling the story of Rock Bridge Park were not that well informed, especially about the role the Downtown Optimists Club played in the development of the park.
  • Ground Breaking Ceremony – Adam Saunders has invited the club members to a ground breaking of the Agricultural Park next to the ARC and Columbia Farmers Market.  The event takes place at 10:00 on Nov 18th.
  • Cash Register Training at the Club House 5:30 on Nov 16th, immediately before the board meeting.
  • Tree lot sign up.  Every Monday at lunch and the electronic sign-up sheet will be emailed out for your use.
  • Boys and Girls Club Open House.  Carl Scott attended this event noting the $10,000 grant our club provided to make this new addition possible. He toured the new gym, audio studio and culinary kitchen, all built to provide services for H.S. kids.
  • Holiday luncheon:  Dec 11th at the Club House.

 

 

Today’s Speaker

Jerry Kiesling, MU Adult Day Care Program

Jerry Kiesling, (rhymes with Riesling) Director of the Day Connect, told stories of the services provided by the center for incapacitated clients. The program operates in Clark Hall at Mizzou. Jerry described their services as an alternative to a Nursing Home except clients go home each night and sleep in their own bed. They have a capacity for 24 clients and provide tailor made programming. There is a nursing staff to handle medications. They offer occasional field trips. Clients can come for a day relieving their caretakers or 5 days a week for those with a working spouse. Clark Hall is located on the east side of Providence Ave. just south of Turner Ave. It has easy access to drop off patients and return to Providence Ave.

 

Most clients are brought to the program by their caretakers. The exception is for veterans where the VA covers the cost of special transportation to and from the program. Currently, there are 17 day residents in the program, about a third of whom are veterans. At a cost of $89.00 a day, this program provides a needed service to caretakers and is priced very competitively when compared to nursing home costs of $80,000 to $120,000 per year.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Nov 13 – Nikki Burton, Great Circle

Nov 20 – Professor Jeanne Abbot – MU School of Journalism, Professional Standards and Cold of Ethics.

Nov 27 – TBD

Dec 4 – TBD

Dec 11 – Holiday Lunch at the Club House

Dec 18 – TBD

Dec 25 – No Meeting

Jan 1  – No Meeting

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

10.30.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

October 30, 2017

Call to order:  Ed Musterman, President at 12:05

Invocation: Mary Dewey

Pledge: Phil Rodriquez

Introduction of Guests   

Debby Thomas whose family is the original owners of the DOC Clubhouse came with her granddaughter, Ashley. Her family was in the construction business and built the clubhouse. She brought album pictures to show the original use of the building: a home accessories store on the ground and living quarters on the second floor.

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

Jim Murphy has a birthday on Sunday, November 5.

 

Mystery Person – Cyrilla Galbreath awarded the Hy-Vee Card to Steve Winters for all the work he is doing to keep the club on track with Koeze Nut sales.

 

Greeter   – Recognition and comments from Saturdays work crew at the tree lot.  John Sapp, Ken Oster, Rick McKernan, Larry Fick, Mike Russell, Jim (the hammer) Murphy, C.O. Scheffer, Tony Parisio, Travis Kempf and Nick Litteken. Scott Stager came at 10:30 only to find the grounds closed and all the work completed. “Many hands make light work.”

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig – Carl Scott paid the pigs and mentioned his attendance at the Tiger Hotel to view the three Salvador Dali paintings newly acquired by the owner.
  • Food Bank – Larry Fick mentioned there were too many memorable event between last Monday and today to remember the routine tasks our volunteers performed last week at the Food Bank.
  • E MO 1st Qtr Convention – Moberly, Oct 27 – 28th – Executive Cmte on Friday evening was attended by Ed Musterman and Rick McKernan,  Saturdays General Membership meeting was attended by Mary Dewey, Red and Dorcas Leighton and Ed Musterman.

An excellent meeting hosted by the Moberly Optimist Club with good attendance with some members coming as far away as 250 miles. “Optimist Strong” was the theme and presented by Certified International Trainer Bob Schilling from Michigan.  Lots of great and inspiring information.  Item of note is that Optimist are the largest service organization in the United States and the 4th largest in the world. OI is strongly pursuing a well thought out strategy for growth and part of that is an increased emphasis on establishing JOI clubs and “Clubs within a Club”.  OI is pursuing a program of international growth with new clubs established in 8 African clubs including Uganda. (OI uses skype to communicate with the Uganda Optimist Club.) BTW the DOC dropped its first place standing in the A & A Point. We achieved second place this quarter. This is a challenge to Mary Dewey and Ken Oster to regain our first place.

  • Koeze/Gift Certificates – Updates. Steve/Jake VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AT NOON, THURSDAY, NOV 2. & 5:00 pm FRIDAY. We are expecting 3 pallets of Koeze nuts and candies. Volunteers should gather at noon to unload the delivery truck. With enough volunteers the job can be completed within the noon hour.
  • Help needed at the tree lot Friday night, Saturday and Sunday to pick and pack Koeze orders.  Some past help will not be available so it is important that volunteers step up.  Steve will be at the club house Friday night but won’t be able to be there until about 1:00 on Saturday. Experienced help is needed to commit to Saturday morning to work and guide any new volunteers.
  • Tree Lot – John Sapp reports the Christmas trees will be delivered a week from Saturday. The truck unloading will be done by the MU Baseball team that Saturday morning, Nov 11 at 8:30 am. While the team forbids any Optimists from touching any of the trees, John Sapp recommends it wouldn’t hurt to have a few of our grey headed members show up and so the team could better appreciate the need.
  • YOHO/Alternative general membership meeting. –  Group to meet 5:00 Friday at the club house to help unload Koeze’s.
  • Holiday luncheon:  Dec 11th at the Club House.
  • Phil Rodriquez noted his 11 year old daughter attended the Dept. of Conservation’s Young Hunters’ Class, qualified with 6 target hits within 2 inches of the target’s bulls-eye at a range of 100 yards (None of the boys attending hit the target) and got her deer hunting license. Later she shot her first deer and will be featured on the cover of the” Conservation” magazine. Phil is very proud of his daughter and paid the pig for his family’s notoriety.
  • Carl Scott mentioned MU Wrestling will hold its first outdoor meet at the MU Baseball field after the Missouri vs. Illinois football game on Saturday.

 

Today’s Speaker

Boone Co Commission, Sales tax ballot issue

Commissioner Fred Parry made the Use Tax ballot issue presentation on the upcoming (Nov. 7) election day to a standing room only crowd of Optimists. Proposition U will be on the ballot for all residents of Boone County  Separate ballot issues for the cities, Harrisburg, Ashland and Columbia, will appear for residents of those cities as well. The Use Tax is a tax on goods and services purchased from a vendor outside the State of Missouri for goods and services used inside the State of Missouri.  It would apply to items purchased online from an out of state vendor where no sales tax is applied or in the example provided on the Boone County hand-out materials to build and furnish student housing in Columbia from out of state vendors where contractors avoided payment of approximately $3,750,000 in city and county taxes on the $100 million material costs to create additional student housing.

 

Commissioner Parry mentioned several times that Amazon has agreed to pay the Use Tax for purchases within Boone County. (He omitted mentioning Amazon will collect Use Taxes from Boone County buyers until Steve Winters Questioned him.) He cited the Slice Survey that claims 43% of online purchases are made through Amazon.  He mentioned that sales taxes have not kept pace with the population growth. The educational materials provided didn’t help his argument. They showed a 68% population growth from 1984’s population of 104,531 to 2017’s population of approximately 176,000. But sales taxes were expressed in annual growth rates ranging from a high of over 10% during several years to a negative growth rate of approximately 2% in two reporting cycles The math works out to a 68% growth in population over a 31 year period or an annual average growth rate of 1.7% while the average annual average sales tax rate is considerably higher.

 

A $2,000 Use Tax exemption was mentioned. The word exemption is misleading. It refers to a requirement that any taxpayer purchasing over $2,000 of goods in a calendar year from an out-of-state vendor should self-report this to the state and presumably pay the Use Tax. If Amazon has already collected a Use Tax, there are no provisions for a refund. Businesses can expect an audit for this but there is yet to be a mechanism to audit individual taxpayers. Also, while the ballot language is ambiguous, the hand-out materials and Commissioner Parry assured his audience the Use Tax and Sales Tax are either/or taxes. No one will pay both for the same item.

 

Commissioner Parry’s argument for Proposition U (and Prop 1 for Columbia residents) was that both local government and retail businesses suffer because buyers exercise tax avoidance by using the internet for purchases. Scott Stager mentioned that buyers also purchase goods using the internet for convenience nullifying any expected local retail sales gains. We’ll see. Amazon has already created a moat to protect itself from other online vendor with Amazon Prime that give its shopper unlimited shipping for $100 per year. If tax avoidance is the motivating factor some local shopper may chose an alternative online provider that doesn’t collect Use Taxes.

 

The county expects it will gain $900,000 in general revenue while the city could reap $1 million with the Use Tax in place. The County currently runs county services for $70 million annually. Commissioner Parry described the County as “lean and mean.” However, no mention was made of what the County will do with an additional $900,000 or of the unanimous vote in mid-October by the county salary commission to continue salary increases according to a 1997 formula which amounts to an estimated $2,000 salary increase for each elected official or of the $160,000 the City and County must pay for the Nov. 7 special election. Both City and County apparently believe their odds of success are greater in a low voter turnout Nov.’17 election than one in April ’18 when the Columbia Public Schools will be requesting additional bonding authority and the City of Columbia will be requesting a tax increase for additional police. If the Use Tax is passed in November it will become effective April 1, 2018.

 

The State of Missouri already has a Use Tax in place collecting its 4.225% on out-of-state sales. Callaway County also has a Use Tax in place and collects about $30,000 a month in general revenue.

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Nov 6- Jerry Keiling, MU Adult Day Care Program

Nov 13 – Nikki Burton, Great Circle

Nov 20 – Professor Jeanne Abbot – MU School of Journalism, Professional Standards and Cold of Ethics.

Nov 27 – TBD

Dec 4 – TBD

Dec 11 – Holiday Lunch at the Club House

Dec 18 – TBD

Dec 25 – No Meeting

Jan 1  – No Meeting

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

10.23.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

October 23, 2017

 

Call to order:  Ed Musterman, President at 12:08 pm

Invocation: Dave Murphy

Pledge: Cyrilla Galbreath

 

Introduction of Guests   

None but Shirley Beckett was declared as our Honorary guest

Birthdays and Anniversaries

None

 

Mystery Person  –  Larry Fick awarded today’s gift certificate to Jim Beckett, the most optimistic member of our luncheon group who brings his wife to share our luncheons.

 

Greeter   – Mary Dewey is working on the Almeta Crayton food drive. She finishes her last of the neighbor gathering at Indian Hill Neighborhood at 5:00 today. And, Friday she will work on the Halloween Party at the North Neighborhood.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig. John Sapp and Carl Scott contributed to the Childhood Cancer (Pig) fund today. John neglected to sign in. Carl paid for the Club’s recognition in the recently published Columbia Directory. An article starting on page 15 mentioned the Police Department’s undefeated basketball team in last season’s Columbia Youth Basketball Association’s league games was sponsor by the Downtown Optimists. (The Club is sponsoring two (2) teams again this year. See below.)
  • Food Bank –  Larry Fick reported our Food Bank team worked on separating frozen bacon, chicken and fish for the food pantries.
  • E MO 1st Qtr Convention – Moberly, Oct 27 – 28th – Attending, Mary Dewey, Red and Dorcas Leighton and Ed Musterman
  • Board Meeting –
  1. Two funding requests: Columbia Youth Basketball-$300 to sponsor two teams. Big Brothers/Big Sisters – Funded $2,000 of the $4,695 request.
  2. The board had a lengthy discussion on the budget. A draft budget has been tentatively agreed on.  The board will amend the budget at the Feb board meeting to more accurately reflect income from Tree lot and Koeze nut sales.  In light of the uncertainty with Koeze sales this year, the board determined at this time it is prepared to defer or deny lower priority grant requests until income for this fiscal year is more accurately determined. Board minutes will be emailed to club members when they have board approval.

 

  • Club Social and Installation of Officers. – October 24th. Updates. Social- Dave Murphy & Steve Winters, Invocation – Ed Musterman  Steve Winters reported 36 are signed up for the dinner but there is sufficient food for some to pay at the door.
  • Koeze/Gift Certificates – Updates. Steve/Jake Orders for the first delivery date are due Tuesday, Oct 24.
  • Tree lot workday – Saturday, Oct 28th starting at 8:30. John Sapp.  Ed is keeping a list of volunteers to make sure there is enough help.  Ed spent three (3) hours over the weekend contacting members to help. Please let Ed know if you can help. Volunteers should bring a hammer that will be needed to tear down the old tree stands. Absent a hammer, there is still plenty of work with the lot clean-up
  • Tree Lot – John Sapp. John expressed concern about the lack of help on the last work day. He fears if we can’t get help to work to prepare the lot for tree sales, we certainly won’t get member help to sell trees. John changed grower this year anticipating the trees will be slightly smaller. This may calm older member concerns about loading trees on car tops. The Mizzou Baseball time has volunteered to help unload trees on Nov 11. But, if we have to hire help to sell the trees, the net contribution to our fundraising efforts will be less.
  • YOHO/Alternative general membership meeting. C.O. Scheffer reported this was a good meeting. Kelly Schiller has volunteered to help in a leadership role. The group agreed to contact potential recruits from other parents and adults in the under 45 age group from their church group and other organizations
  • Holiday luncheon:  Dec 11th at the Club House.  HyVee will do the catering and the entertainment will be provided. (No indication Ridgeway Elementary School choir has been confirmed.)

 

 

Today’s Speaker

 

Oct 23 – Capt Jenny Atwell, Boone Co Sheriffs, Detention

Jenny did her internship at the Boone County Jail while completing course work at Columbia College in Criminal Justice. She completed a minor in psychology at the time which has served her well for work at the jail. Upon graduation she accepted a position as a correctional officer at the jail but never expected to make a career there. However, in 24 years she worked her way through promotions from a line officer to sergeant to lieutenant and now captain in charge of the jail.

 

Jails are distinguished from prisons. Jails are county detention facilities housing prisoners awaiting trial who have not made bail. Only sentenced prisoners serving sentences of less than a year can be house in a county jail. Of the 205 inmates in the Boone County Jail only 4 are sentenced offenders. Prisons, on the other hand are state or federal institutions housing prisoners sentence to time longer than a year. Jails fall under state and federal laws. Separate space is required to maintain a separation between the several different classes of inmates. Women are separated from men; pretrial offenders are separated from those sentenced. Other segregation is provided to provide inmate safety. The sheriff is in the process of expanding the jail capacity from 223 inmates to 246 by adding bunk beds in the area currently housing the most dangerous offenders. These prisoners are accustomed to sleeping in individual rooms. Their beds will be converted to bunk beds to increase the jail capacity without any new construction. Jails can reach capacity before they reach the overall capacity because of the segregation requirements. Jail inmate are detainees who are unable to make bail while they await trial.

 

The jail is a high stress place to work. Inmates accustomed to unlimited movement before jail are confined to a smaller area where their movements are limited and monitored. And, they don’t always get along with other inmates or the correctional officers. A few are nasty by nature. Approximately 20% of the inmates suffer from mental illness including bi-polar disorders and schizophrenia. So if they have been self-medicating outside, access to illicit drugs is cut off. Incidents are a daily occurrence.

 

The hiring of correctional officers is a 2 month process of screening and training. Many apply for the $17.50 per hour positions, but few are chosen. While the pre-requisite requirement is a high school diploma, ex-offenders and recent drug users are barred. The ability to learn the strict policies and procedures and work in a high stress environment is key to getting and maintaining work at the jail. Officers are not peace officers but are trained in weapons (fire arms, pepper ball and tsars) as well as self-defense. Correctional officers carry no weapons inside the jail. So they must know how and have the ability to execute self-defense tactic for 30 seconds or so, long enough for help to arrive.

 

Any groups wanting a tour of the jail can contact Capt. Atwell. She is hiring new correctional officers. . There are two main areas to work: 1) control room where there is no contact with inmates. These officers are responsible to log in and log out inmates, monitor movement and monitor the audio visual camera to insure officer and prisoner safety. Floor Officers work in the cell area coming into contact with detainees. They are unarmed so the ability to de-escalate a tense situation is important.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Oct 30 – Boone Co Commission, Sales tax ballot issue

Nov 6- Jerry Kiesling, MU Adult Day Care Program

Nov 13 – Nikki Burton, Great Circle

Nov 20 – Professor Jeanne Abbot – MU School of Journalism, Professional Standards and Cold of Ethics.

Nov 27 – TBD

Dec 4 – TBD

Dec 11 – Holiday Lunch at the Club House

Dec 18 – TBD

Dec 25 – No Meeting

Jan 1  – No Meeting