09.25.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Sept 25, 2017

 

Call to order:  Ed Musterman, President – at 12:05

Invocation: Charlie Langreder

Pledge: C.O. Scheffer

 

Introduction of Guests   

Kelly Schilling, new member and mother of recent Soap Box Derby winner was introduced.

John Weber, Environmental Scientist with US Fish and Wildlife came to check out the Optimist to possibly join the club.

Neil Carr, Downtown Rotary, joined the luncheon group to announce his club’s recent fundraiser.$20.00  Raffle Tickets to win a 2017 BMW 328i/Mercedes Benz GLA 250/Harley Davidson StreetGlide Special winner’s or 50/50 cash split – winner’s choice. Only 3,000 tickets will be issued. Funds are to benefit Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Boys and Girls Club, Welcome Home Veterans, Rainbow House, Voluntary Action Center, Food Bank, Youth Empowerment Zone, Central MO Humane Society, Ronald McDonald House and Local Rotary Service Projects. Drawing will be held Tuesday, Nov 21 at Downtown Rotary Luncheon (Courtyard Marriot on 3301 Lemone Industrial Blvd. 11:30 – 1:00. (Need not be present to win), If you missed Neil and want to get raffle ticket: go to https://tinyurl/y7rvm4jy or http://www.facebook.com/ColumbiaDowntownRotary/

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

Cyrilla Galbreath celebrated a birthday on August 31.

 

Mystery Person  –  Red Leighton awarded this week’s luncheon ticket to Dave Murphy.

 

Greeter   –  Sid Sullivan greeted more than 25 luncheon guests and explained his absence last week as he attended the musical “Hamilton” in Chicago. Two minutes is insufficient time to describe all the staging, costumes, choreography, musical orchestration and clever dialogue that went into this 2 ½ hour production of 34 musical numbers. Instead he talked of the wonderful musical portrayal of the remarkable immigrant American, Alexander Hamilton, who came to this country from a French speaking Caribbean Island at age 14 to take his “shot’ at the American Dream.  He graduated from Columbia University with a law degree at age 21, joined the Revolution to gain fame in battle only to become Washington’s aide. He handled all Washington’s correspondence and was successful in getting the reluctant Confederation to belatedly pay for the War. Fluent in French he befriended the Marquis d’Lafayette and may have been instrumental in gaining French support for the war. He wrote 51 of the 85 Federalist Papers to convince the country (mainly New Yorkers) to adopt the U. S. Constitution. He was appointed this country’s first Treasury Secretary where he established our banking system, established tariffs and created the coast guard. As an overachiever committed as a federalist, he attracted some influential rivals including Jefferson, Madison and Burr. The uncompromising defense of his civic character ultimately lead to Hamilton’s untimely death. We all know he was killed in a duel with Vice President Raymond Burr. Only in death did Hamilton’s detractors extol his accomplishments.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig-Carl Scott paid the pig for getting notoriety in the “Columbia Tribune.” Cyrilla Galbreath also paid the pig as her name was mentioned in an article of the “Missourian” announcing a program expansion at the Thompson Center for Autism.
  • Food Bank – No comments.
  • E MO 1st Qtr Convention – Moberly, Oct 27 – 28th – Need attendance.  Location: Comfort Inn, 1801 W. Outer Road, Moberly.  Registration form to be emailed with the Newsletter this week.  Or let Ed or C.O know by Oct 8th for the early discount.  Program to be “Optimist Strong” training by Bob Schiller, Certified International Trainer.
  • Club Social and Installation of Officers. – October. Dave Murphy & Steve Winters are organizing a shrimp feed with “dirty rice” and all the fixings for a Tuesday or Thursday in the last week in October. (TBA)
  • Koeze/Gift Certificates – Steve/Jake.  Sell, Sell, Sell.
  • Sept Board Meeting – No grant requests. Ratification of votes for new members, Kelly and Evan Schilling, and a $2,999 payment of bill for AC repair.
  • Jabberwocky Mural dedication – Optimist Park – 9/24 – Attended by Red Leighton, Carl Scott, Pat Kelly, Sue and Ed Musterman. Columbia Care (City of Columbia’s Youth Grant) and another sponsor paid for the mural.
  • Ronald McDonald House – 9/26 – Sasha’s House dedication 11:00 to 11:30

 

 

Today’s Speaker

Liz Bird,  Food Bank for Central and Northeast MO.

Liz Bird has been with the Food Bank for 8 months and recalled her first grateful encounter with the Downtown Optimist securing a grant of $5,000 for the Buddy Pak Program. She introduced her new assistant Crystal Backer, Regional Coordinator for Southern Boone. She mentioned upcoming events “Taste of Tiger” fundraiser on Thursday Oct 5 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm. Tickets are $50.00 per person. Head football coach Barry Odom will officiate. More information is available at: www.scoreagainsthunger.org/  Also Kids Helping Kids event will be held on October 14 at the Central Missouri Food Bank. Kids 4 to 12 are invited to package food for hungry kids. There will be two session: 9:00 – 11:00 for the 4 – 8 year olds and noon – 2:00 pm for the 9 – 12 year olds. Call 73-447-6609 for more information.

 

CMFB serves food to 100,000 people each month in a 32 county area covering 18,000 square miles of land in central and northeast Missouri. That number equates to one in six (1 in 6) people in this area are touched by this food bank. CMFB is the only food bank in Missouri that provides food free of charge thanks to donation of time and money from people and organizations. They have 140 partner agencies to distribute food including food pantries, soup kitchens and shelter. And, because of their transparency have received a 4-Star rating from Charity Navigator.

 

Food Programs include Senior Boxes for the fastest growing group needing food assistance. 2,684 senior boxes are distributed each month. VIP Veteran Pack, a new pilot program sponsored by Veterans United provides 650 VIP Vet Boxes to veterans in poverty. The program will need permanent funding to continue. Buddy Packs serve 7,500 kids in 155 schools each week at a cost of $180 per child per year. Summer Food 4 Kids where weekday lunches are served to kids 18 and under for free.

 

There is a focus on fresh food to include produce protein and dairy to provide better nutrition. These items are more expensive but with the contributions of growers like Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture, Share the Harvest (4-5,000 deer contributed by MO hunters and processed into individual 1-pound packages of venison annually) and individual farmers and gardener costs are contained. In addition 46,000 2-hour shifts of volunteers save staffing costs of approximately $2 million. More information is available at www.ShareFoodBringHope.org/

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

 

Oct 2 – Phil Rodrigues, Member Spotlight

Oct 9 – Great Circle

Oct 16- Jane Whiteside’s, MO Symphony.

Oct 23 – Capt Jenny Atwell, Boone Co Sheriffs, Detention

Oct 30 – Boone Co Commission, Sales tax ballot issue

Nov 6- Jerry Kiesling, MU Adult Day Care Program

Nov 13 – Nikki Burton, Great Circle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

09.18.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Sept 18, 2017

 

Call to order:  Ed Musterman, President

Invocation: C.O. Scheffer

 

Pledge: Jim Murphy

 

Introduction of Guests   

Charlie Langreder presented his wife, Bonnie, as our only guest.

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

Birthdays: Jim Murphy 9/3, Charlie Langreder 9/9, John Sapp 9/17.

 

Mystery Person 

Ed Musterman presented the Gift Card to Steve Winters for his good work with the Koeze sales.

 

Greeter   –  Max Miller robustly greeted each member and our guest speaker as they arrived for the meeting.  Max reported that in preparation for his move to Kansas City to be closer to his family he held a garage sale.  The garage sale was a great success and Max said a constant parade of old men kept him busy socializing and opining on a variety of subjects. Max had a lot of fun and financial success.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig – 25 cents went to feed the pig from Red Leighton who left his badge at home.
  • Food Bank – Will be closed for staff training on Monday, Sept 25th.
  • E MO 1st Qtr Convention – Moberly, Oct 27 – 28th – Need attendance.
  • Club Social and Installation of Officers. – October. No updates
  • Koeze/Gift Certificates – Steve/Jake  . Steve reported that he had delivered 20+ catalogs in the past week and had 7 orders in hand.
  • Board Meeting – Thurs 7/21  –  No funding requests or big issues so it should be a short meeting.
  • Youth Community Coalition – 9/19 – Tuesday
  • Jabberwocky – Optimist Park – 9/24.  Dedication of the mural painted by Jabberwocky at Optimist Park.
  • Ronald McDonald House – 9/26.  Invitation to a dedication of “Sasha’s Store” from11:00 – 11:30.

 

 

Today’s Speaker

Mike Mathis, Columbia City Manager

 

Mr. Mathis was accompanied by his associate Casey Hall and presented the City of Columbia strategic plan addressing social equity.  You can find the strategic plan at http://www.como.gov/strategic-plan .   Mr. Mathis explained the high correlation between poverty and crime as well as a host of other social ills.  He stated that there is a huge disparity in poverty and resulting crime between white and black citizens.  Mr. Mathis provided a great deal of statistical and survey evidence from Columbia that black citizens were heavily disadvantaged for achieving success.  No statistical evidence exists that people in poverty, white or black, are not desiring to be fully employed and be productive citizens.  He also stated that the minimum wage in 1968 could purchase 30% more than in 2015.  If the minimum wage had merely increased by the rate of inflation it would be $20/hr today.  Mr. Mathis stated that the citizens of the country had lost sight of why the minimum wage was established.  Today a worker fully employed at the minimum wage cannot afford the rent on an apartment anywhere in the U.S. much less food or clothing.

 

The City of Columbia  has established a program to support black youth to work as summer interns in business, schools and non-profits.  The program Care Awareness Related Experience (CARE) mentors youth to prepare them for success in the work force by coaching on attitude, dress, manners and responsibilities among other things.  When the youth are place in an intern program they are paid minimum wage and the pay is provided to the employer by the city.  Mr. Mathis says that scholarships solicited to provide the program are $1,500/yr for each student.  This past year there were 425 applicants and financial resources were only available to enroll 187 in the CARE program.  Of the youth reporting to jobs as interns, 95% completed the program. 

 

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Sept 25 – Great Circle

Oct 2 – Phil Rodrigues, Member Spotlight

Oct 9 – TBD

Oct 16- Jane Whitesides, MO Symphony.

Oct 23 – Capt Jenny Atwell, Boone Co Sheriffs, Detention

 

 

 

09.11.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

Sept 11, 2017

 

Call to order:  at 12:05 by Ed Musterman, President

Invocation: Larry Fick presented a meditation reflecting on a timeline of events, bravery, and loss of life and consequences of the 9/11/01 attack on our country on this sixteenth anniversary.

 

Pledge:          Steve Winters

 

Introduction of Guests   

Rick Kitchen, Kids First Club President, came to announce the “Magic and Heroes Trivia Night”  fund raiser for Kids First Optimist. The event will be held at American Legion, 3669 Legion Ln in Columbia.  Prizes for the best “Magic” or “Heroes” costume and table decorations will be awarded. Doors open at 6:00 pm, Choir sings at 6:30 and Trivia (by Smarty Pants Trivia by Davis Entertainment) starts at 7:00. Tickets are $15.00 for adults, students for $12.00. Bring your own food/snacks. Drinks are available for purchase

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

 

None

Mystery Person  – Phil Rodriguez wrote down a number and asked members to take a turn at guessing the number. The lucky number was 11. Ed Musterman chose that number and got a free lunch.

 

Greeter   – Steve Winters reported the members from all 28 Task Force 1 teams were represented in Texas. They are all just returning to Columbia. Currently Task Force 1 has ten members working in Puerto Rico and one member in the Virgin Island. Steve got very emotional recounting all the places around the country where Task Force 1 has been dispatched talking of the hardships disaster victims have had to face.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In or Pay the Pig: Carl Scott paid a quarter for Mike Russell who was recently recognized in the paper for his antique truck.
  • New air conditioner at the club house installed today.
  • E MO 1st Qtr Convention – Moberly, Oct 27 – 28th – Need attendance.
  • Club Social and Installation of Officers. – October

Dave Murphy volunteered to head up the social with the help of Steve Winters. Max suggested he may return for the socials.

  • Special thanks to Steve for the extraordinary effort in preparing the Club for the Koeze sales effort if he is absent at some points to serve with Task Force One.
  • Lessons from the 4th qtr E MO Dist convention Aug 18-19th.

Optimism is known as a “Hands On” club.  Some other civic clubs give more money but Optimists are known to be heavily involved with activities that benefit youth. It is surprising number of recent retirees who became Optimists at some of the clubs in the last 1 to 3 years and are assuming leadership roles in their clubs.

  • Activity Report from Carl Scott

Carl has remained the most active volunteer of the Downtown Optimist and will soon be leaving us for family matters. He joined the Optimist to make a difference and challenges others to do the same. He paid the $0.25 for the publicity Mike Russell got for his antique truck. He recently attended the open house at Douglas H.S. and Coyote Hills. He recommends the following books as “good reads:” 102 Minutes and Red Bananas. He also provided a list of volunteer work done by our club:

  1. Club members volunteered 3000 hours for our club this past year (Oct 1, 2016 – Sept 30, 2017).
  2. Club members attended 70 community events (DOC, other local Optimist clubs, and other youth organizations).  This entailed either hosting, sponsoring, volunteering, or participating at these events.
  3. Club members volunteered at 35 ‘DOC Food Bank Volunteer Day’.  Club has been doing this every Monday afternoon after our weekly meeting since Jan 1, 2017.
  4. Club funded 25 separate youth organizations.
  5. Club submitted 190 A&A forms to the EMO District.
  • President Musterman singled out Rick McKernan for the tidiness of the upper floor of the clubhouse: derby cars are stored in an orderly manner, tools are in their place, club records are properly stored and the floor was cleanly swept.
  • Condolences were express to Mary Dewey on the recent death of her mother, Freda Martz.

 

 

Today’s Speaker

Steve Winters  – Koeze Nuts and Restaurant Gift certificates sales effort. 

Steve presented a well-organized sales packet for each member. Koeze Nut brochures were stuffed with the letter from the president and for former Red Leighton customers, a letter from Red. Each packet came with an order book and purchase history from prior customers. BE SURE TO PUT CARDBOARD UNDER EACH ORDER when writing up a new sale. (White copy goes to customer, Yellow copy to Ed Harre, Pick copy retained by sales person. Deadlines for Koeze Nut orders are as

follows:

ORDER         Due Date       Delivery Date

1st                    Oct 24            Nov 6

2nd                  Nov 7              Nov 20

3rd                   Nov 28           Dec 11

 

Any sales person who wants customized contact information to peel off and stick to customer copy (needed for call back to order or where to send payment) should contact Steve for a customized sheet of peel-off labels. (winters@missouri.edu)

 

SELL, SELL SELL. It’s important to hit our sales goals to have $50 to $60,000 to distribute for kids activities. Start each sale with Koeze Nuts before offering the restaurant certificates

 

There is a new Restaurant Certificate brochure in each packet with a picture of each restaurant: Murray’s (certificate for food only – no tax or tip, no change), Shakespeare and Sophia and Addison’s are gift cards, D. Rowe’s and Chris McD’s are certificates (no change). Members patronizing any of these restaurants are encouraged to thank them for their participation in our fundraiser. The DOC earns 30% of each $25.00 card/certificate. (BTW, our swimmer who designed the brochure took a gold medal in a recent European swim meet.)

 

Last year the gross profits from each of our fund raising items were as follows:

Peanut Brittle                          $1,260.00

Koeze Nuts                           $27,027.17

Christmas Trees                   $23,014.51

Restaurant Certificates        $7,110.00

 

It’s going to be tough without Red Leighton and Jim Beckett but we need to hit these numbers. Steve is encouraging all sales people to add fie (5) new customers. Jake Jolley tells us we have increased the certificates 10% each year. It’s been good for us and it’s been good for the restaurants.

 

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Sept 18 – Mike Mathis, Columbia City Manager

Sept 25 – Great Circle

Oct 2 – TBD

Oct 9 – TBD

Oct 16- Jane Whitesides, MO Symphony.

 

 

 

08.28.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

August 28, 2017

 

Call to order:  Ed Musterman, President at 12:05

Invocation:     Max Miller

Pledge:          Jim Murphy

 

Introduction of Guests  

Jim Beckett introduced his wife, Shirley. Charlie Langreder introduced his wife and chauffeur, Bonnie. New members Tony and Leslie Parisio, first time luncheon attendees, were introduced.

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

Ken Oster has his 67th wedding anniversary on Saturday, Sept. 2. Sid Sullivan has his 42nd wedding anniversary on Wednesday, August 30.

 

Mystery Person  – Harold Rowe made the luncheon award to wounded bowman, Charlie Langreder.

 

Greeter   – Charlie Langreder watched the eclipse on his driveway with his wife, Bonnie. He is attending physical therapy three times a week after rotary cuff surgery. His therapist tells him she will have him ready to return to hunting by the last week of bow season. His surgeon says no way. Either way he is motivated to improve his right shoulder. Also, Charlie was able to check some of his 70 cameras along the White River. He saw lots of white tail deer but no bucks.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In and badge or Pay the Pig: all were signed in.
  • Scrap Book- Club scrapbooks were entered and judged at the 4th quarter E. MO district meeting in St. Louis.  DO newsletter scrapbook took 2nd place with tough competition from several clubs. Thank you Mary Dewey for putting together some of the best scrapbooks at the meeting.
  • AA points.  DO Optimist Club reported the highest number of AA points for its division in the E MO district and received a $25 check.
  • Optimist Red Leighton – At the District meeting Red was recognized for recruiting over 150 Optimist members and Ed Musterman accepted a framed certificate and special pin on his behalf. Appreciation at the district meeting was expressed loudly and long.
  • Honor Club – It appears that with the two new membership applications Rick McKernan has in hand that the Downtown Optimists will qualify as Honor Club if a contribution is made to the OI Foundation for any amount.
  • Board Meeting – Requests from Columbia Youth Basketball and Ronald McDonald House were heard. Ronald McDonald House was granted.  The board regretfully tabled the Columbia Youth Basketball request to October. Their request was small but it was the second in the same fiscal year. The board reluctantly accepted the resignation of Max Miller as a board member.
  • Tony Parisio has accepted the invitation to join the board to fill out the remainder of Max’s term ending September 30, 2018.
  •  Sept 11, Steve Winters to present Koeze sales plan.  Steve was deployed to Nebraska for exercises as part of Task Force 1 and Sean Spence was good enough to move up his scheduled date as a guest speaker to today.

 

Today’s Speaker

 

Sean Spence, Better Business Bureau, Ethics Instruction in the High School program

Most people think of the BBB as a clearing house for people searching for a product or service from a reputable business. To this end the BBB evaluates and accredits local businesses and makes their findings available to anyone seeking information. In former times business was done on a handshake but that has not always worked in a larger more complex society. The BBB sees its mission as Building Trust in the Community by evaluating and accrediting businesses.

 

The BBB has expanded its role in creating trust by providing ethics seminars to school children and groups. Partnering with Schnuck’s and other businesses, the BBB has put together a complete curriculum on ethics and presented it to school teachers. Sean has given four talks to Douglas H.S. students, worked with Battle H.S. and presented at the Elden Resource Center. Today he came to give an interactive mini-seminar of the work he does with students.

 

In a 2011 Survey high school students who were given the opportunity to respond anonymously to some basic ethical questions. The results showed: one in three (1 in 3) students admitted to stealing, eight of ten (8 of 10) lied to their parents, 59% cheated on a test and one in three (1 in 3) admitted to plagiarizing written assignments from the internet. When presented this information, the majority of current students (8 of 10) say these numbers are too low. So the question Sean posed to the group is whether ethics should be taught in schools or left to other societal institutions of Family, Religion, Employment and Politics. He posed the situation his wife encountered when one of her students, a 17 year old physically attractive girl whose mother is a stripper and father pimps for her mother was encouraged by her parents to forgo higher education for the money she can make as a stripper in LasVagas. (Retirement planning?)

 

Sean posed some questions to the group: Is it a good idea to be an ethical person? Are there times better for you to be unethical? Are there situational ethics? What is your personal framework for decision making?:  (What family says and does? What religions teach? What parents teach their children? Tummy check on how this decision feels in your gut?) He offered an acronym to structure decision making: H.E.A.R.T. Will my decision Hurt someone? Will it benefit Everyone involved? A…  Is it Responsible? Is it Transparent (Can I publish it in the newspaper)? These are the values this curriculum uses for ethical decision making. It deliberately leaves out religious and politically partisan values for a more generic and universal path to an ethical life.

 

 

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Sept 4 – No Meeting, Labor Day

Sept 11- Steve Winters

Sept 18 – Mike Mathis, Columbia City Manager

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

08.14.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

August 14, 2017

 

Call to order: Mary Dewey, Vice President at 12:05 p.m.

Invocation: Ken Oster

Pledge: Jim Murphy

 

Introduction of Guests  

 

Bonnie Langreder accompanied husband Charlie – She is acting as chauffeur while Charlie is recovering from his shoulder surgery.  Charlie reports that his rehabilitation is proceeding nicely.

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

 

None

 

Mystery Person 

 

Mary took the mystery person responsibilities this week and awarded it to Carl Scott for all the work on the community BBQ last week, and personally purchasing beverages and other items.

 

Greeter   –  Harold Rowe

 

Had a good last week.  He is looking forward to the Eclipse.  He has been planning for 6 months or more to have his entire family of four adult children and their spouses from the far corners of the country all at one place at the same time.  He said it has been a lot of years since that has happened.  They will be here for the entire weekend.  Prior conversations indicated that he and his wife had planned so well that they have booked an entire bed and breakfast for the occasion.  Well, that really required planning in advance.

 

Announcements

 

  • Sign In and badge or Pay the Pig – Mary paid for her name appearing in the Missourian from Sat event – Someone said she was also on TV as part of that event.
  • Scrap Book- Mary reports that it will be finished by this Thursdays board meeting
  • Essay Contest – Carl – still looking for participants. Discussed optional ideas.
  • Carl Scott – Update on his plans for moving – close to being gone.  Packed and ready to move.
  • Ric reports that the big Oak tree on the clubhouse back lot is down – all but the main trunk. Their have been discussion about whether to cut for firewood or have something carved.  It is a Pin oak so not as valuable to lumber or firewood gatherers as are other oaks.  Professional carver wold cost $1100.  Suggestion was made to carve it into a Christmas tree.  Reportedly it is solid and not hollow.  Lots of chainsaws in hands of club members, but no one is yet admitting to having the artistic skills needed. Hey, sounds like a have fun with chain saw event – but be careful guys.

 

 

  • Today’s Speaker

 

Cheryl Unterschutz of Heart of Missouri Girls on the Run

 

Girls on the run is a national organization with independently run locally organized non profit groups.  Their origins go back to Charlotte NC 20 year ago.  They are present in every state in the US and Canada.  There are five independent organization in Missouri.

 

Their goal is building Confidence, Competence, Connection,Character, & caring in young girls.

 

From their brochure:

 

“Trained volunteer coaches use our research-based curricula to teach foundational lessons through dynamic discussions, activities and running games.   Over the course of the ten-week program, girls in 3rd-8th grade develop essential skills to help them navigate their worlds and establish a lifetime appreciation for health and fitness.  Our program culminates with girls positively impacting their communities through a service project and being physically and emotionally prepared to compete a celebratory 5K event”.

 

They run two ten-week programs a year, one in the fall, and one in the spring.  This is done in full cooperation with local school or community organizations where the activities occur as an after school event.  Participants meet twice a week for 90 minutes each time.  Two age groups are involved, elementary 3rd thru 5th grades, and middle school 6th grade thru 8th grades.

 

Again from their brochure:

 

“Studies show that during adolescence, girls’ confidence drops about twice as much as boy’s, friendships become more complicated and challenging, girls’ perception of their academic success declines, their risk for anxiety and depression goes up and their participation in physical activity plummets”.

 

Their after school sessions culminate with training for an end of program 5K run.  Volunteer coaches (really mentors) work with girls in teams of 8-20 in various sites across Mid-Missouri.  Running becomes a way to teach them to set goals and work towards them.  The final event is an actual 5K run with adult running buddies.  These buddies can be family, friend or a volunteer.  It is a celebratory non-competitive event

which is not timed.  No winners, just the joy and camaraderie of participating.

 

The organization partners with Columbia Parks and Recreation, using the Bear Creek Trail for the run.  As many as 600 people from around mid-Missouri participate in this event.

 

There are 18 elementary schools and community programs involved in Central Missouri.  They have successfully reached out to smaller communities in the area.  Last year 350 girls were involved, 200 in the fall and 150 in the spring.  They are currently registering for the fall.  There is a monetary charge for participation, but ample scholarships are available.  One of the community programs operates out of the Boys and Girls Club where girls who are members of that organization pay no additional fee for participating in Girls on the Run.

 

A quote:

 

“Girls on the run makes a stronger impact than organized sports and physical education programs in teaching life skills”.

 

Cheryl shared one heart warming story of a girl who participated in Girls on the Run.  At the beginning she was totally introverted, had no friends, and was socially isolated.  Within weeks, she was becoming an active participant, showing progress in social and friendship skills, and was determined to finish the 5K run.  Due to physical limitations she was the last participant on the field, and when her new friends saw her determinedly struggling to finish the race they ran back onto the field, surrounding her and emotionally supported her to the finish line. Now the girl is a continuing participant and speaks confidently to groups of people in support of Girls on the Run.

 

How to help?

 

Volunteer coaches are always sought.  This requires a commitment of twice a week for 10 weeks.  This more of a mentoring job than coaching in the traditional use of the word.

 

Volunteers are sought to assist with the 5K run.   These runs will occur this year on November 11th, and at the end of April.

 

Running buddies are needed for girls who may not have a family member or adult friend to actually participate with them in the run.

 

Help fundraise for scholarships.

 

Support their major fund raiser titled “Cocktails in Sneakers”.  Thursday September 28, 2017 in the Champagne Ballroom 3919 S Providence here in Columbia.

 

  • Wear your cocktail attire with your sneakers
  • Free admission & food
  • Cash Bar
  • Live & silent auction
  • Meet GOTR participants
  • Opportunities to support scholarships for girls

 

In addition, this year, Girls on the Run is one of the six supported charities of the Tigers on the Prowl campaign now in progress.  The culmination of that is a Gala & Auction on Thursday, August 31, 2017 at the Holiday Inn Executive Center.  Participation in events of that program will directly support Girls on the Run.  For that event see http://tigersontheprowl.org/tigers-on-the-prowl-auction/

 

Girls on the Run can be contacted at 573-246-0884 or http://www.heartofmissourigirlson therun.org

 

 

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Aug 21 – No Meeting, Solar Eclipse

Aug 28 – Steve Winters, Koeze Nuts

Sept 4 – No Meeting, Labor Day

Sept 11- TBD

Sept 18 – Mike Mathis, Columbia City Manager

 

Adjourned with the Creed by 1:00 p.m.

 

 

Optimistically Yours,

Scott Stager

Shanghaied scribe

 

08.07.2017 Weekly Bulletin

The Weekly Bulletin

August 7, 2017

 

Call to order: Mary Dewey, Vice President at 12:05

Invocation: Rick McKernan

Pledge:  Owen Schilling, Soap Box Derby driver

 

Introduction of Guests   

Colton Wake, Super Stock Derby Driver and his father, Jason Wake

Max Keicher, Stock Derby Driver, and Chris Keicher, grandmother

Owen Schilling, Derby Driver, and Evan and Kelly Schilling Parents, plus aunt and grandmother.

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

None

 

Mystery Person  – Ken Oster gave the award to Chuck Boots for all the work he has done to keep the derby cars running.

 

Greeter   – Nadia Ryakhmyatullov

Nadia had a tiring, busy, pushed to her limit week as the new general manager at the Tiger Hotel. She is up to the challenge and happy she made the change. She mentioned several job openings at the Hotel and restaurant.

Announcements

  • Sign In and badge or Pay the Pig  Carl Scott paid the pig for Jessica Kempf (not present) who was recently mentioned in the Columbia Tribune for completing the tough Weikert Realty Real Estate program.
  • Scrap Book- Mary Dewey is still collecting items for the scape book. She even used her phone to create additional pictures of today’s event with the derby champions and their families.
  • Oratorical Contest – Rick had no new information. . Topic for the 2017-18 School Year is: “Can Society Function Without Respect?” Youth under the age of 18 as of October 1, 2017
  • Essay Contest – Rick had nothing to add from last week. . Topic for the 2017-2018 School Year is: “Where are My Roots of Optimism?” Students under the age of 18 as of October 1, 2017 are eligible. Interested students need to submit a speech on the pre-assigned topic to one of the local Optimist Clubs. More information can be found at: http://www.optimist.org/e/member/scholarships4.cfm
  • Possible evening speaker – Steve Winters is still awaiting a response from the potential speaker.
  • Koeze Nut sales efforts update if any – Steve Winters will have all the information and materials need for the Koeze Nut sales and order takers at the Aug 28 meeting.
  • Food Bank volunteers – Carl, Jim, Larry. Carl Scott mentions the DOC club as a whole has contributed 155 hours of volunteer services at the Food Bank during the first six months of the year. That number could be improved if we had more members volunteering to help.
  • Optimist Golf Tournament Carl Scott reported Columbia’s lone contestant, Ryan Choe of Rock Bride H.S., successfully completed the 1st and 2nd rounds at the tournament but was eliminated in the 3rd.
  • The Old Oak Tree on the Clubhouse Grounds  Rick McKernan reported the City Power and Light removed all but one limb on the tree to prevent it from damaging any city power lines. The final limb will be removed later this week. The remaining tree trunk is sturdy and could make an excellent totem pole. Any takers of wood carvers or chain saw artists?
  • Next week’s speaker – Cheryl Unterschutz, Exec Director, Girls on the Run
  • No meeting August 21st – Solar eclipse

 

Today’s Speaker

Aug 7 – Soap Box Derby drivers and families

All the proud derby contestants and their families were excited to present the stories of events in Akron at the International running of the Soap Box Derby. It was a family event complete with a parade a second Derby race on the Wednesday preceding the Saturday main race. The week-long event was filled with activities and fellowship for the kids and their families. All were given a great Ohio “Welcome.” The Derby champions were given a model derby car, complete with weights to experiment with optimal positioning of those weights in a simulated race. They designed their own unique campaign buttons which the Derby committee then produced 200 for each derby champion. The kids could exchange their button with others as a way to meet others from around the country.

 

Colton Wake, the return winner, was excited to participate in his second International Derby. He was able to tell the other family’s what to expect to make their trip to Akron a little less stressful. He also told of how he first got involved in Derby racing. He had noticed the derby car in the Optimist Clubhouse when he was with his family purchasing a Christmas tree. He never thought much of it until one year he asked about it. It was all history from then on. As a two time winner, he is out of options to compete in the local derby races. But he does have the option of competing in Rally Races as a path to Akron. He is off to Kansas City this weekend for his first Rally Race.

 

Max Keicher came with his grandmother.  He thought the trip to Akron was a great experience. “It’s not all about winning. There is a lot of fun in racing.” He plans to participate in the Rally Race.

 

Owen Schilling came with a prepared speech, props and a photo album of his trip to Akron. While neither he nor his father were initially interested in the local derby race, his mother, Kelly, kept encouraging them to sign up. They all thought it was just a Sunday event in Columbia. Then, as Owen prepared for his final race and a chance to win in his race class, the family discovered winning that race was a ticket to Akron. That’s when the family cheering began. Kelly Schilling thanked the Optimist for our support in making this family outing possible. The family has just returned from their vacation and without the financial support of the DOC, they would not have been able to make the trip to Akron. Owen mentioned in his speech the great experience of meeting kids from all over the U.S. and even one from New Zeeland, of being a part of a friendly family event with people you didn’t know, of a great learning experience and of learning to win or lose and share the joy and fun with others. Owen is hooked. He is off to Kansas City for the Rally Race this weekend.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Aug 14 – Cheryl Unterschutz, Girls on the Run

Aug 21 – No Meeting, Solar Eclipse

Aug 28 – Steve Winters, Koeze Nuts

Sept 4 – No Meeting, Labor Day

Sept 11 – TBD

Sept 18 – Mike Mathis, Columbia City Manageer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adjourn reluctantly with the Creed: 1:00

 

Optimistically Yours,

Sid Sullivan

Secretary

07.31.2017 Weekly Bulletin

Call to order: by V.P. Mary Dewey at 12:05

Invocation: Red Leighton

Pledge: Phil Rodriquez

 

Introduction of Guests

Rick McKernan introduced his grand-daughter, Halley (famously known for her Halley’s Comet derby car), who is visiting from Kansas City

 

Missing Members

Charlie Langreder is still recovering from rotary cuff surgery.

 

Birthdays and Anniversaries

None

 

Mystery Person –

Sid Sullivan gave this week’s award to Harold Rowe who protected our turf at the Show Me State Games. Harold arrived early at the soccer field when a group of squatters selling Show Me merchandise tried to appropriate our table and tent cover. He got them to find their own table and tent cover which they moved several feet away from ours.

 

Greeter   – Jim Murphy had a quiet weekend traveling to New Franklin; this time without backing his wife’s car into any foreign object. He had a nice dinner with his wife.

 

Announcements

  • Sign In and badge or Pay the Pig  All were signed in.
  • Show Me Games – (Jake), Mary had last weekend volunteers raise their hands to be recognized.
  • Scrap Book- Mary Dewey is still looking for additional photographs of our Optimists at work.
  • Oratorical Contest – Rick McKernan emphasized the benefit of the Oratorical contest for public speaking as a vital tool for leadership in adult life. Last year the national winner was awarded $22,500. Topic for the 2017-2018 School Year is: “Where are My Roots of Optimism?” Students under the age of 18 as of October 1, 2017 are eligible. Interested students need to submit a speech on the pre-assigned topic to one of the local Optimist Clubs. More information can be found at: http://www.optimist.org/e/member/scholarships4.cfm
  • Essay Contest – Rick repeated the announcement of this upcoming February, 2018 event. Feel free to join this committed by contacting President Ed Musterman (eemusterman@gmail.com) the club needs to spread the word to youth groups and churches to attract more kids. Topic for the 2017-18 School Year is: “Can Society Function Without Respect?” Youth under the age of 18 as of October 1, 2017
  • Soap Box Derby Rick McKernan reminded the group that the Columbia Derby contestants along with their family will be at next Monday’s lunch. Rick circulated the plaque the club received from the Akron Derby Committee. It is inscribed: 1st Energy All-American Soap Box Derby “Outstanding Race City” Columbia, Midlands, MO dated 7/22/17 Akron, OH. There was no explanation of how we got to be known as Columbia Midlands.
  • Crime Prevention Month: The month of August has been designated “Crime Prevention Month.” To wit, the Ridgeway Neighborhood Association is sponsors a crime free event at Optimist Park on Tuesday evening from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. Games for kids and food will be provided. Community Policing Officer Jesse is expected to attend. Members are encouraged to attend and support this event.

 

Today’s Speaker

Brianna Lennon, Atty,  New MO Voter ID law

Brianna is currently a private attorney with offices in the Forum Shopping Center. She announced several months ago of her intention to seek the position of County Clerk upon Wendy Noren’s retirement. She was unsuccessful in getting an interim appointment from the governor after Wendy’s untimely resignation for health reasons. (Wrong Party) She formerly worked for the Secretary of State assisting local and county government with election transparency.

 

The Constitutional Amendment requiring a photo ID to vote takes effect at the August 8 election. During prior elections the Voter ID Card along with signature verification was sufficient to vote. Now a voter present at the poll on Election Day must provide a valid driver’s license. Yet, a passport or military ID can be substituted. Voters without a photo ID are not out of luck. They can swear to their identity on an affidavit. Upon signature verification they will be granted a provisional ballot. And, unlike provisional ballots in the past, these ballots will be counted. However, the photo ID rule does not apply to absentee ballots or mail in ballots.

 

A person without a photo ID and wishing to vote can obtain a non-driving ID from the Division of Motor Vehicles. A birth certificate and bill or envelope showing their current address is required. Other DMV rules may apply if a person has changed names.

 

The one issue on the ballot for all voters in Boone County is the 10 year extension of the ½ cent sales tax for Roads and Bridges in the county. When asked to explain this issue, Brianna mentioned the County Commission originally allowed the sales tax law to substitute for a 26 cent per $1,000 of assessed valuation property tax. The current ballot issue has no organized opposition and has been endorsed by the local Chamber of Commerce and has the support of the County Commission. Given the need for funds for the upkeep and maintenance of county roads and bridges, the Commission has the option of passing a property tax should the ballot issue fail. Brianna emphasized the Commission has given no indication of this action.

 

UPCOMING SPEAKERS

Aug 7 –  Soap Box

Aug 14 – Cheryl Unterschutz, Girls on the Run

Aug 21 – No Meeting, Solar Eclipse

Aug 28 – Steve Winters, Koeze Nuts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adjourn with the Creed: 1:00

Optimistically Yours,

 

Sid Sullivan

Secretary