12.13.2021 Weekly Bulletin

Downtown Optimist Club of Columbia

Zoom/In Person Meeting Newsletter

Monday, December 13, 2021 at Senior Citizen Center

Members attend in person: President Tony Parisio, Jerry Sullivan, Rick McKernan, Carl Scott, Red Leighton, Steve Winter, Charlie Langreder, Ken Oster, Mike Hatchett, and Mary Dewey By zoom Scott Stager and Deb Swanegan  and our special guest were Bonnie Langreder and

Prayer- Rick McKernan and Pledge – Jerry Sullivan

Birthday/Anniversary: N/A

Steve Winter talked about the Koeze Nuts: The third order in and ready to be picked up at the clubhouse.

Christmas Trees: We sold out in 14 days. Chuck bought the last 4 trees and closed up the tree lot. Then Carl sold the 4 trees for $15.00 each on Friday afternoon. Only thing left at the clubhouse are Koeze nuts and Amish Peanut Brittle. We will be selling these items 10 % to 20% off at our luncheon on Monday, December 20th.

We talked about the Christmas Luncheon, which will at the clubhouse on December 20th. We will have HyVee Catering. Cost will be $10.00 to $12.00 a person that without checking with HyVee. We will be garlic roasted pork loin and chicken, roasted vegetables, white mac and cheese, and crispy apple salad.

Our Guest Speaker: Rolando Berry from Missouri Highsteppers

Located 2306 Oakland Gravel Road tow house from the Fire Station. 3 years since they have been at the Boys and Girls Club

THE HIGHSTEPPERS CREED

I am responsible for the decisions I make in this life. I am the one who determines who I am, what I do and what I will become. Compassion and hard work are my tenets. Gentleness and resoluteness my hallmark.

I will strive to maintain a positive attitude about life, to work hard at every task I undertake and to persevere in the face of life’s difficulties.

I pledge to be a role model to others and to make empathy and kindness my personal guiding light.

How it came to be: Rolando Barry founded the Missouri Highsteppers — formerly known as the Blind Boone Highsteppers and the Mid-Missouri Highsteppers — in 1979. He belonged to similar drill teams as a child in St. Louis.

What we do:  We are an outreach program that encourages youth to become part of a team and part of a community. We strive to instill life and character building principles by encouraging discipline, work ethics, and teamwork.

ABOUT US Our Mission

We strive to provide opportunities for growth and development through enrichment activities centered on character building, leadership, health and life skills, education, career, sports, recreation, fitness and the arts.

By utilizing a group of positive, committed, caring staff and volunteers to serve as role models, we are able to inspire and enable all youth to realize their fullest potential and help students become responsible, productive and caring adults.

We enhance services to youth and parents by collaborating with other organizations.

Above all else, we provide a safe place for youth to learn and grow physically, emotionally and spiritually. Youth are able to safely travel throughout the United States and abroad, performing intricate and rigorous routines for a variety of venues, which allows for a sense of discipline, responsibility, coordination, and team building skills.

Our Vision

To provide members with a sense of purpose, a commitment to excellence and an understanding that all members can become productive and successful contributors to the Missouri High Steppers, our communities and our society.

Missouri High Steppers’ Mission

Provide opportunities for growth and development through enrichment activities centered around character building, leadership, health and life skills, education, career, sports, recreation, fitness and the arts.

Utilize a group of positive, committed, caring staff and volunteers to serve as role models.

Inspire and enable all youth to realize their fullest potential and help students become responsible, productive and caring adults.

Enhance services to youth and parents by partnering with other organizations.

Provide a safe place for youth to learn and grow physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Travel throughout the United States and abroad, performing intricate and rigorous routines for a variety of venues.

Closed with the Optimist Creed by Tony Parision.

Meeting end at 1:00 pmTony Parisio – President                                             

12.06.2021 Weekly Bulletin

Downtown Optimist Club of Columbia

Zoom/In Person Meeting Newsletter

Monday, December 6, 2021

at Senior Citizen Center

Members attend in person: President Tony Parisio, Jerry Sullivan, Rick McKernan, Carl Scott, Red Leighton, Steve Winter, Charlie Langreder, Ken Oster, Mike Hatchett, Mike Russell and Deb Swanegan By zoom Scott Stager and John Jones, and our special guest were Bonnie Langreder

Prayer- Deb Swanegan and Pledge – Jerry Sullivan

Birthday/Anniversary: N/A

Steve Winter talked about the Koeze Nuts:

Christmas Trees:

Tony like to thank everyone who worked this weekend at the Christmas tree lot. Tony let us know that we were up to $100,000 worth of sale so far for the tree lot. There were only 92 tree lefts.

We talked about the Christmas Luncheon, which will at the clubhouse on December 20th. We will have HyVee Catering. Cost will be $10.00 to $12.00 a person that without checking with HyVee.

Played a fun game of matching who did what. Everyone wrote down 3 items about themselves and Rick read them off one at time. We would try to match them to help to the person. It was a tie between Mike Hatchett and Jerry Sullivan. Tony would buy their lunch next week for winning.


Here is a list of all the items wrote down from each member:

Steve Winter: Hiked across the Grand Canyon 5 times, Soloed hang-glided from a 1400’ launch platform, have summited 8 of the 52 14,000’ peaks in Colorado.

Jerry Sullivan: Name was in the Guinness Book for Records for receiving the longest letter in the world, Hiked and camped in Grand Canyon for a week, Ran over myself with the tractor broken my arm at age 13.

Bonnie Langreder: Youngest of 5 siblings, Graduated from Williams Wood’s University, 1 son 2 grandsons and 3 great grandchildren.

Scott Stager: High school Valedictorian, Played trombone for 8 years, lettered in 3 sports.

Charlie Langreder: Has owned many Camaros in lifetime grew up on a farm, had a childhood favorite dog name.

Mike Hatchett: Skied on a glacier above the Arctic Circle, born in the 70’s, showered today

Carl Scott: Short and Stumpy, retired old person, Hoosier

Deb Swanegan” Love trains and dollhouses, professional storyteller, has eaten earthworms to encourage kids to read books.

Ken Oster: Had Jay Ashcroft for a student at UMR (he used in pen at test time and dropped after test), is a twin (when born he kicked his twin out of the womb and got named first), used the results of brother’s drafting test to not get drafted in Army

 Mike Russell” Actually 6’6” tall and disguises himself as 5’9” for convenience, have a car that has owned since 1966, live on a 12 acres and owns 6 tractors

Red Leigthon: Born in Maine, married his wife from ????? (Sorry, can’t read it), Charlie and Red worked for the same company

Tony Parision: Likes to play drums, born in Chicago, sky dived from 10,500

Closed with the Optimist Creed by Tony Parision.

Meeting end at 1:00 pm

Tony Parisio – President

11.29.2021 Weekly Bulletin

Downtown Optimist Club of Columbia

Zoom/In Person Meeting Newsletter

Monday, November 29, 2021

at Senior Citizen Center

Members attend in person: President Tony Parisio, Jerry Sullivan, Rick McKernan, Carl Scott, Red Leighton, Steve Winter, Charlie Langreder, Ken Oster, and Larry Fick, By zoom Scott Stager and Mary Dewey, and our special guest were Bonnie Langreder and John Weston

Prayer- Rick McKernan and Pledge – Larry Fick

Birthday/Anniversary: N/A

Steve Winter talked about the Koeze Nuts:

There will be a 3th and last order will be placed on today Monday, November 29th. Everything that is out on the tables at the tree lot is all we have to sell for Koeze Nuts. We will be ordering jelly that is more peach, peanut butter cups and peanut clusters and they will be here on Wednesday.

Christmas Trees:

Tony like to thank everyone who worked this weekend at the Christmas tree lot. It was a very busy day on opening day. There was the lines were wrapped outside the building to pay for their trees and other goods and inside the lot with their trees to be netted for their cars to go home for the first 2.5 hours.

We have all the wreaths and 25 yard roping out of the shed Carl said. Tony said we made about 54 Thousand this year about the same as last year if I hear him right during the meeting. Tony also talk about a little boy who is a MACC Scholar who loved helping carrying out the trees to the cars with the help of the adults and running to do things for them like get the extra branches picked up off the lot and take them to the student making Charlie Brown trees.

We talked about couple of places we could meet at beside the Senior Citizen Center, which we pay $2.00 a person for the room. We will check into J & J café where they don’t charge for the room. We also look at Shakespeare’s Pizza about their meeting rooms. We also looking at the church on Hitt Street, and Dickie BBQ Kids 1st Optimist Club meet at on Wednesday at noon.


Larry Fick is back volunteering at the Central Missouri Food Bank. Let find out what he package up this week and our next meeting.

Kids 1st Optimist Club is having their Christmas Party this Saturday, December 4th at the Sunrise Optimist Club starts at 6:00 pm for dinner dancing starts at 7:00 pm. If you want to eat, it cost you $35.00 and if you just want to dance, it will cost you $25.00. If you want to come please let Marilyn know at 573-268-4876 as quick as you can. This way she will know how much food to order.

Guest Speaker John Weston from Columbia Golf Foundation.

The Columbia Golf Foundation’s vision is to bring the game of golf and the values of the game to the youth of mid-Missouri, regardless of their background or status.  This vision is fulfilled by offering camps and programs that introduce the fun of golf.

Our Mission

Providing access to the game of golf and its values for youth of all backgrounds and skill levels

Our Vision

The Columbia Golf Foundation was created to promote the game of golf and the values of the game to young people of all backgrounds in our community.

Golf is played throughout the world. At every level, from professional to amateur to junior, the game is synonymous with a set of values:

Integrity / Honesty / Respect / Perseverance /Appropriate Conduct & Appearance

Every CGF youth program strives to teach these values to our participants in an environment of fun and healthy physical activity.

Fund Raising Tournament

The Golf In Schools Program is the leading effort of CGF, and it is a program in which we provide equipment to local Mid-Missouri elementary and middle schools and work with their PE staff to add golf to the school’s curriculum. For the past six years, we have taught golf in Physical Education classes in grades K-8 in Mid-Missouri, reaching over 26,00 students during that time frame. We have been to the communities of Auxvasse, Boonville, Centralia, Columbia, Fayette, Harrisburg, Hatton, Mexico, Moberly, Sturgeon, and Williamsburg.

I will send more information about the Columbia Golf Foundation when I can get a copy of the slide show that he showed at the meeting on Monday.

Closed with the Optimist Creed by Jerry Sullivan.

Meeting end at 12:30 pm

Tony Parisio – President

11.22.2021 Weekly Bulletin

Downtown Optimist Club of Columbia

Zoom/In Person Meeting Newsletter

Monday, November 22, 2021

at Senior Citizen Center

Members attend in person: President Tony Parisio, Jerry Sullivan, Rick McKernan, Steve Klein, Carl Scott, Red Leighton, John Jones, Steve Winter, Mary Dewey, Charlie Langreder, Ken Oster, and Larry Fick, By zoom Scott Stager and Jennifer Bagwell, and our special guest were Bonnie Langreder, Ernie and Diana Wren and Megan Steen

Prayer- John Jones and Pledge – Tony Parisio

Birthday/Anniversary: Jerry and his wife will celebrate their 49th Wedding Anniversary on Thanksgiving Day.

Board Meeting on Thursday, November 18th. There is NO funding request. Therefore, we might not have a board meeting this month. NO BOARD MEETING this month

Steve Winter talked about the Koeze Nuts:

There will be a 3th order placed on Monday, November 29th. Steve will be getting the clubhouse ready for opening day on Friday, November 26th. Everything was in for the 2nd order but, there was some that were19 pieces damager. The orders that we could fit will be reordered and replaced.

Christmas Trees:

The trees are all on the pegs and ready to go for opening day Friday. We have all the spots filled for opening day. Need some more extra help during the 2 to 5 shift on Saturday, November 27th. Tony said he will go in and work during that time.

We talked about couple of places we could meet at beside the Senior Citizen Center, which we pay $2.00 a person for the room. We will check into J & J café where they don’t charge for the room. We also look at Shakespeare’s Pizza about their meeting rooms. We also looking at the church on Hitt Street, and Dickie BBQ Kids 1st Optimist Club meet at on Wednesday at noon.


Carl Scott talked about the Food Bank Food drive is on Wednesday from 6 am to 6 pm at HyVee and Schucks. Carl signed up for a 2 hour shift to help collect can food or money donations.

Our guest speaker:  Megan Steens a Vice President of Burrell Behavioral Health. 10 Counties are in Central Missouri.

Information about Burrell there is 25 Countries in Missouri and Northwest Arkansas. 1.7 K Employees, 60 + location, and 45 K

About Burrell Central Region ** Designated Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) for Boone County ** Largest behavioral Health provider in Boone County

Programs and Service: Individual Therapy & Counseling, CCBHC Addition Recovery Services, Psychiatry & Medication Management, Educational & Therapeutic Groups, Crisis Intervention, Case Management, Diagnostic Testing & Evaluations and Developmental Disability Support

Missouri Child Well-Being Data

         1 in 5 children struggle with behavioral & emotional issues in the classroom

         50 % of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by age 14

         Average delay between onset of symptoms & intervention is 8 to 10 years

         14.1% of Missouri High School students seriously considered suicide in 2018

         Estimated over 45,000- children & adolescents in Missouri struggle with anxiety

After point 3 – Average Delay of Onset would never wait that long to seek physical healthcare. Part of the work we do in the community is to normalize seeking mental health care

After Point 4 – 14.1% considered suicide 10.9% made a plan, 6.2% put plan into place with suicidal actions

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) are potentially traumatic events in childhood (0-17 years), such as neglect or experiencing or witnessing violence.

These events can undermine their sense pf safety, stability and bonding. ACES can negatively impact physical, mental, emotional and behavioral development. They can also have long-lasting effects on health, well-being and prosperity well into adulthood.

ACES are major risk factors for illness and poor quality of life. Individuals who repeatedly and chronically experience adversity can suffer from toxic stress. Toxic stress happens when the brain endures repeated stress. Toxic stress happens when the brain endures repeated stress or danger, then releases fight-or-flight hormones like cortisol.

This internal alarm system increases heart rate and blood pressure and damages the digestive and immune systems over time. Our bodies were not meant to live in this hyper-aroused state, and staying in it for prolonged periods of times has negative impact.

Anxiety Signs and Symptoms

         Trouble sleeping or complain about stomachaches or other physical problems

         Extreme fear about specific thing or situation

         Being afraid of school or other places where there are people

Repeated episodes of sudden, unexpected, intense fear that come with symptoms like heart pounding, trouble breathing, dizziness, shaky or sweaty

Panic or tantrums at times of separation from parents or caregivers

         Most common mental health concern is the United States with about 7% of the children ages 3-17 experiencing issues with anxiety each year.

         First Global estimate of impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health in 2020 suggest additional 53 million cases of depressive disorder and 76 million cases of anxiety disorders were due to the pandemic

         Women and younger people were most affected by major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders in 2020

         Depression Signs & Symptoms

                  Feeling or appearing sad, and tearful or irritable

Spending less time with friends or in after school activities and/or enjoying things as much

Changes in appetite and/or weight

Sleeping more or less than usual

Feeling tired or having less energy

Noticeable changes in appearance (not washing hair, clothes you don’t normally wear)

Falling grades, inability to focus or concentrate

Suicidal thoughts, threats or actions

Depression is more that feeling sad or going through a rough patch. It lasts longer and

begins to impact more than just your mood.

We don’t always know the cause of depression. Sometime it seems to come out of

nowhere. Other times, it happens when children are under stress or after losing someone close to them.

Eating Disorder Signs & Symptoms

         Extreme weight loss or not making expected developmental weight gain

         Frequently skipping meals or refusing to eat

         Excessive focus on food

         Persistent worry or complaining about being fat

         Frequently checking in the mirror for perceived flaws

         Using laxatives, diuretics or enemas after eating when they’re not needed

         Forcing himself or herself to vomit or excising too much to keep from gaining weight after bingeing

         Repeating episodes of eating abnormally large amounts of food is one sitting

         Expressing depression, disgust or guilt about eating habits

In the United States as many as 10 in 100 young woman suffer from an eating disorder. This is not to say eating disorders do not occur in men, but they are far more common among women

         Anorexia and Bulimia are the most common eating disorders.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Signs and Symptoms

         Reliving the event over and over in thought or in-play

         Nightmares & Sleep problems

Becoming very upset when something cause memories of the event

Lack of positive emotions

Intense ongoing fear or sadness

Irritability & angry outbursts

Constantly looking for possible threats, being easily startled

Acting helpless, hopeless or withdrawn

Denying the event happened or feeling numb

Avoiding places or people associated with events

         A Child or adolescent who experience a catastrophic event may develop ongoing difficulties known as PTSD. Stressful or traumatic event normally involves a situation where someone’s life has been threatened or severe injury has occurred.

         A child’s risk of developing PTSD is related to the seriousness of the trauma, whether the trauma is repeated, the child’s proximity to the trauma and his/her relationship to the victim.

         How to Help:

                  Care for the children’s mental health just as you do the physical health

                  Pay attention to warning sign and seek professional help if needed

                  Talk with youth in age appropriate, non-judgmental way about your observations

                  Role model talking about feeling and emotions

                  Assist youth in developing coping skills

                  Mindful walks, belly breathing, grounding activity

That was from her power point she showed us at the meeting.

Closed with the Optimist Creed by Jerry Sullivan.

Meeting end at 1:00 pm

Tony Parisio – President

11.15.2021 Weekly Bulletin

Downtown Optimist Club of Columbia

Zoom/In Person Meeting Newsletter

Monday, November 15, 2021

at Senior Citizen Center

Members attend in person: President Tony Parisio, Jerry Sullivan, Rick McKernan, Steve Klein, Carl Scott, Red Leighton, John Jones, Steve Winter, Mary Dewey, Charlie Langreder, Ken Oster, Larry Fick, and Deb Swanegan. By zoom Scott Stager

Prayer- Deb Swanegan and Pledge – Mary Dewey

Birthday/Anniversary: Steve Winter’s 63th birthday

Paying the Pig: Rick McKernan paid $.25 for Jerry and Chuck for cooking the hamburgers for the baseball players, $.25 for each Adam, Steve, Carl and Jim for all their hard work on Saturday.

Tony let us know that we got a check for $39.00 for 3 new members from the East Missouri Optimist District. He also read Thanks you card from Shirley Beckett from the Jim Becketts’s bench that is located near her apartment at Lenoir Apartments.

Board Meeting on Thursday, November 18th. There is NO funding request. Therefore, we might not have a board meeting this month. NO BOARD MEETING this month

Steve Winter talked about the Koeze Nuts:

2nd order of Koeze Nuts came in this morning and unload. Some boxes were damaged give him a couple of days to go through the boxes that are damaged.  He will be putting the orders together at 6:15 pm on Wednesday, November 17. Steve would like to Thank the following people who help Wednesday.  Carl Scott, Larry Fick, Jerry Sullivan, Kelly Schilling, Sandra Searcy-Davis and her daughter Gidget, Becca and myself.  If I missed anyone, please forgive me.  We started at 6:15 and were done by 8:15.

Christmas Trees:

We wanted to thank all 42 baseball players who came out on Saturday, November 13 to help unload and drill the Christmas trees. We had 2 loads of tree that came in on Saturday. All the trees are drilled and ready to for sale for Black Friday. The baseball team stayed to unload the 2nd truck that was late. They had it unloaded in 8 minutes. Then went on to the football game.  

The 3th and 4th load of trees will come in sometime between November 15th and 18th during the day and will need help unloading them at short notice. The drilling of the trees will start the next day Sunday, November 14th. The hours of drilling will be from 8:00 to 11:30 am or 12:00 pm stop for lunch. Then start back up at 1:00 to 4:00 pm. This will be the hours until all the trees are drilled and ready to sell on Black Friday, November 26th.

We will need extra help the first week of sale which Black Friday and our busy weekend. C.O. will adding more slots for this on the sign up sheet.  We need to check with other organization to see if they can up with drilling and selling of tree to help us save money from hiring out to other people in the community.

Mary Dewey would like Carl Scott for helping ringing the red kettle bell today at the Pro Bass Shop.

We talked about couple of places we could meet at beside the Senior Citizen Center, which we pay $2.00 a person for the room. We will check into J & J café where they don’t charge for the room. We also look at Shakespeare’s Pizza about their meeting rooms.

Rick McKernan talk about Sleep Heaven Peace that Curtis Porter Zone 2 Lt. Governor wants to see Central Missouri.  There are already chapters here in Missouri they are located in North Kansas City, South East Kansas City, Springfield, Wentzville, Rolla, Marshfield, Mary Height and Poplar Bluff.  Debbie and I will love to be on the committee we love to see kids happy to have their own bed to sleep on than the floor in their house. Here is some information about the Sleep Heaven Peace.  Website to see more: www.shpbeds.org

HELPING CHILDREN IN NEED
SLEEP BETTER

We fully believe that a bed is a basic need for the proper physical, emotional, and mental support that a child needs. When it was brought to our attention that the need for beds went far beyond our own neighborhoods, we stepped up and took initiative. We’re a national organization answering the call to a national problem.

All children deserve a safe, comfortable place to lay their heads. In Idaho and across the U.S., too many boys and girls go without a bed – or even a pillow – to sleep on. These children end up sleeping on couches, blankets, and even floors. This can affect their happiness and health.

That’s where Sleep in Heavenly Peace comes in. We’re a group of volunteers dedicated to building, assembling and delivering top-notch bunk beds to children and families in need. Our organization has grown steadily over time, and we’re working on opening more chapters in different states to serve more people. No kid sleeps on the floor in our town®.

Building Beds for Kids in Need

Participating in one of our Build Days is an exciting experience. There’s always something to do from the moment you arrive, sign in, and get your safety gear until the last SHP logo is branded on the final headboard of the day. Volunteers – under the guidance of SHP chapter team members – build bunks in an assembly line setup. There are stations for sawing, sanding, drilling, assembling, staining, and branding the wood. What started as a pile of raw lumber from the hardware store becomes ready-to-deliver bunks for kids in need.

Bed Deliveries

Once the bunks are built, they serve no good until they’re delivered. As exciting and fun as building bunks can be, giving beds to kids is why we do what we do. Volunteers who help deliver beds get to see first-hand the direct impact their efforts can have on a kid’s life. For some, it will be the first time they’ve ever slept in a bed of their own.

Because bed deliveries can be sensitive situations, Chapter Presidents will coordinate a small group of volunteers from each build to be a part of the process.

Bedding Drives

Did you know that we provide each child that we deliver a bed to with a brand new pillow, sheet set, and comforter? You can help us with this ongoing need by hosting a bedding drive! It’s as simple as requesting the participation of your friends and family in donating bedding for the benefit of local kids in your area. Alternatively, you can host a bedding drive by reaching out to a business, church, or other organization that would be interested in supporting Sleep in Heavenly Peace. To sign up as a bedding drive volunteer, find your local Chapter and let them know you’d like to be a bedding drive volunteer.

Closed with the Optimist Creed by Jerry Sullivan.

Meeting end at 1:00 pm

Tony Parisio – President